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Data Recovery Glossary (Letter G J K N O Q Z )

February 11th, 2010

GB (Gigabyte)
One gigabyte is 1,000,000,000 (one billion) bytes or 1000 (one thousand) Megabytes.

Jumper
In EIDE drives, a jumper is an electrically-conductive component that you place over pairs of pins that extend from the circuit board on the hard drive jumper block to connect them electronically. For example, a jumper is one way to designate a hard drive as master or slave. The jumper block is located next to the 40-pin connector on the hard drive.

Just-in-time (JIT)
A production and inventory control process in which components and materials are delivered to an assembly point as needed. This process is used in many hard drive manufacturing facilities.

Kilobyte (KB)
1024 bytes, although it often considered to be a unit of 1000 bytes. In the case of computer memory, which is partitioned into sizes that are a power of two, a kilobyte is equal to 2 10 or 1024 bytes.

Network Computer
A kind of computer that contains limited data storage capacity and is used to communicate with a central data storage facility such as a server or RAID system.

Operating System
Software that allows the user and programs installed on your system to communicate with computer hardware such as a hard drive.

Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)
In the case of the hard drive and data recovery industries, OEM customers are companies such as Compaq, Gateway, IBM and Dell.

Qualification
The process by which sample components are tested for their compatibility and utility as parts of a system.

Queue
A first-in-first-out (FIFO) data structure used to sequence multiple demands for a resource such as a printer, processor, or communications channel. The host adds objects to the end of the queue and takes them off the front.

Zoned Recording
Increases the number of sectors on the outer tracks of the drive since the circumference of the outside tracks is greater. This type of recording affords more disk capacity because there can be more sectors on the larger outer tracks than would be possible if the number of sectors per track were constant for the whole drive.

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