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How to use Disk Management to set up a Hard Drive

December 23rd, 2010 Comments off

How to use Disk Management to set up a Hard Drive To start Disk Management:

  1. Log on as administrator or as a member of the Administrators group.
  2. Click Start -> Run -> type compmgmt.msc -> click OK. Alternatively, right-click on the My Computer icon and select ‘Manage’.
  3. In the console tree, click Disk Management. The Disk Management window appears. Your disks and volumes appear in a graphical view and list view. To customize how you view your disks and volumes in the upper and lower panes of the window, point to Top or Bottom on the View menu, and then click the view that you want to use.

How to create a new partition or a new logical drive:

To create a new partition or logical drive on a basic disk:

  1. In the Disk Management window, complete one of the following procedures, and then continue to step 2:
    1. To create a new partition, right-click on the Unallocated space on the Basic disk where you want to create the partition, and then click New Partition.
    2. To create a new logical drive in an Extended partition, right-click on the free space on an Extended partition where you want to create the logical drive, and then click New Logical Drive.
  2. In the New Partition Wizard, then click Next.
  3. Click the type of partition that you want to create (either Primary partition, Extended partition, or Logical drive), and then click Next.
  4. Specify the size of the partition in the Partition size in MB box, and then click Next.
  5. Decide whether to manually assign a drive letter, let the system automatically enumerate the drive, or not assign a drive letter to the new partition or logical drive, and then click Next.
  6. Specify the formatting options you want to use (such as setting a drive label name) by using one of the following procedures:
    1. If you do not want to format the partition, click Do not format this partition, and then click Next.
    2. If you want to format the partition, click Format this partition with the following settings, and then complete the fields in the Format dialog box.
  7. Confirm that the options selected are correct, and then click Finish.
  8. You should be able to see the new drive listed under My Computer with the new drive letter assignment and the drive label name.

Solid State Drive Vs Hard Drive Vs USB Flash Drive

November 18th, 2010 Comments off

SSD vs USB Flash Drive vs Hard Drive Solid state drives (SSD): used in the enterprise are data storage devices that use non-moving fl ash memory technology rather than rotating magnetic disks or optical media. SSDs are compatible with traditional hard drive interfaces, such as SATA or SAS, and have a familiar hard drive form factor, such as 3.5-, 2.5- or 1.8-inch.

USB Flash Drive: consists of a flash memory data storage device integrated with a USB (Universal Serial Bus) interface. USB flash drives are typically removable and rewritable, and physically much smaller than a floppy disk. Most weigh less than 30 g (1 oz). Storage capacities in 2010 can be as large as 256 GB with steady improvements in size and price per capacity expected. Some allow 1 million write or erase cycles and have a 10-year data retention cycle.

USB flash drives are often used for the same purposes as floppy disks were. They are smaller, faster, have thousands of times more capacity, and are more durable and reliable because of their lack of moving parts. Until approximately 2005, most desktop and laptop computers were supplied with floppy disk drives, but most recent equipment has abandoned floppy disk drives in favor of USB ports.

USB Flash Drives Vs Solid State Drives
Both USB flash drives and SSDs use NAND fl ash memory. However, it’s the quality of NAND used—as well as the controller and interface involved—that separates a simple USB fl ash drive from an enterprise-class storage device, like those found in blade servers and external storage systems.

Solid State Drives Vs Hard Drives
Today’s SSDs are different from hard drives when it comes to data storage. SSDs are sophisticated storage devices that use non-moving memory chips, mostly non-volatile NAND fl ash, instead of the rotating magnetic disks found in hard drives. Hard drives can take the data directly from the host and write it to the rotating media. In contrast, SSDs can’t write a single bit of information without first erasing and then rewriting very large blocks of data at one time (also referred to as P/E).

Because SSDs and hard drives have different strengths in terms of effi ciency, they complement each other and can co-exist. SSDs deliver ultra-fast random data access (inputs-outputs per second, or IOPS, performance), low power consumption, small size and high physical resilience (due to no moving parts)— but they cost more. Hard drives provide fast sequential data access with high capacity, endurance and reliability at a much lower price.

Deals of the Day: Hard Disk Drives

July 28th, 2010 Comments off

TOSHIBA MK3265GSX 320GB 5400 RPM 8MB Cache 2.5" SATA 3.0Gb/s Internal Notebook Hard Drive -Bare Drive 1. TOSHIBA MK3265GSX 320GB 5400 RPM 8MB Cache 2.5″ SATA 3.0Gb/s Internal Notebook Hard Drive -Bare Drive

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WD SiliconEdge Blue SSC-D0128SC-2100 2.5" 128GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) – OEM 2. WD SiliconEdge Blue SSC-D0128SC-2100 2.5″ 128GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) – OEM

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WD SiliconEdge Blue SSC-D0064SC-2100 2.5" 64GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) – OEM 3. WD SiliconEdge Blue SSC-D0064SC-2100 2.5″ 64GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) – OEM

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HITACHI HDS721050CLA362 (0F10381) 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive 4. HITACHI HDS721050CLA362 (0F10381) 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5″ Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

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Seagate Barracuda LP ST32000542AS 2TB 5900 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drive -Bare Drive 5. Seagate Barracuda LP ST32000542AS 2TB 5900 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5″ Hard Drive -Bare Drive

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What is the difference between a primary and extended hard drive partition in Windows

June 16th, 2010 Comments off

Disk Management A hard drive can be divided into primary and extended partitions. Partitions function as physically separate storage units. This allows you to separate different types of information, such as user data on one partition and applications on another. A hard drive can contain up to four primary partitions, or up to three primary partitions and one extended partition, for a maximum of four partitions.

There can be only one extended partition on a hard disk, so you should include all remaining free space in the extended partition. Unlike primary partitions, you don’t format extended partitions or assign drive letters to them. You divide extended partitions into segments. Each segment is a logical drive. You assign a drive letter to each logical drive and format it with a file system.

For more information about Disk Management in Windows 2000 and how to use it to setup your hard drive, please see Microsoft Article 323967

For more information about Disk Management in Windows XP and Windows Vista and how to use it to setup your hard drive, please see Microsoft Article 309000

Why is Drive Translation necessary?

June 9th, 2010 Comments off

image DOS and DOS based programs like Windows 3.x and Windows 95 cannot access drives over 1024 cylinders on their own, but require third party assistance to use large hard drives. SCSI drives handle this with drivers built in to the SCSI controller, so we will limit this discussion to ATA hard drives. There are several methods used to overcome the cylinder limitation, and all of them involve translation.

A translation scheme converts information from one form to another and back again. Think of it like this: If you go to a foreign country to conduct business and you don’t speak the language, you need a translator. The translator’s job is to convert information from one party into a language the other party can understand and vice versa. Without the services of a translator, the two parties have a limited exchange of information. A smile, a nod, and a mispronounced and grammatically incorrect “How are you?” is about all that is possible.

The types of translation support are as follows:

1. An ATA (IDE) host adapter with a BIOS that provides large drive support.

2. Third party software like EZ-Drive® and DiscWizard Starter Edition.

3. A motherboard BIOS that provides large drive support. Some of the terminology is as follows:

  • Logical Block Addressing (LBA)
  • Large
  • Extended Cylinder, Head, Sector (E-CHS)
  • Sector Translation
  • Sector or Track Mapping

These support features are the “language” translators that allow your operating system and hardware to speak two different “languages” and still interact successfully with one another.

All of the BIOS options, once installed, are transparent to the user. EZ-Drive and DiscWizard Starter Edition are not. In addition, there is one issue that both share — special procedures are needed to boot to a diskette when installing new software.

Dynamic Drive Overlay software like EZ-Drive and DiscWizard Starter Edition use similar techniques, at first glance, to overcome the 1024 cylinder limitation. Both programs load proprietary translation information on the boot hard drive that identifies which drive is using the program and gives the operating system access to the area of the drive over 1024 cylinders. Without this proprietary translation code loaded, the drive using EZ-Drive or DiscWizard Starter Edition is unrecognizable to the operating system. If the hard drive is using translating software, and you try to boot with an unmodified diskette in the floppy drive, the translating software does not get a chance to load, thereby rendering the hard drive unreadable. This is generally only a problem if the diskette is infected with a virus. Simply remove the diskette and reboot. The hard drive should boot normally.