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Data Recovery From Physical & Logical Damage

June 16th, 2011

Logical Damage Data Recovery:

Data Recovery From Physical & Logical DamageOverwritten data
When data have been physically overwritten on a hard disk it is generally assumed that the previous data are no longer possible to recover. In 1996, Peter Gutmann, a computer scientist, presented a paper that suggested overwritten data could be recovered through the use of Scanning transmission electron microscopy. In 2001, he presented another paper on a similar topic. Substantial criticism has followed, primarily dealing with the lack of any concrete examples of significant amounts of overwritten data being recovered. To guard against this type of data recovery, he and Colin Plumb designed the Gutmann method, which is used by several disk scrubbing software packages.

Although Gutmann’s theory may be correct, there’s no practical evidence that overwritten data can be recovered. Moreover, there are good reasons to think that it cannot.

Corrupt filesystems
In some cases, data on a hard drive can be unreadable due to damage to the filesystem. In the majority of these cases, at least a portion of the original data can be recovered by repairing the damaged filesystem using specialized data recovery software. This type of data recovery can be performed by knowledgeable end-users as it requires no special physical equipment. However, more serious cases can still require expert intervention.

Online Data Recovery
“Online” or “Remote” data recovery is yet another method to restore the lost or deleted data. It is same as performing the regular software based recoveries except that this kind of recovery is performed over the Internet without physically having the drive or computer in possession. The recovery technician sitting somewhere else gains access to user’s computer and complete the recovery job online. In this scenario, the user doesn’t have to travel or send the media to anywhere physically.

Although online data recovery is convenient and useful in many cases, it still carries some points making it less popular than the classic data recovery methods. First of all, it requires a stable broadband Internet connection for it to be performed correctly, which many third world countries still lack. Also, it cannot be performed in case of physical damage to media and for such cases, the traditional in-lab recovery has to take place.

Physical Damage Data Recovery:
A wide variety of failures can cause physical damage to storage media. CD-ROMs can have their metallic substrate or dye layer scratched off; Hard disk drives can suffer any of several mechanical failures, such as head crashes and failed motors; Tapes can simply break. Physical damage always causes at least some data loss, and in many cases the logical structures of the file system are damaged as well. Any logical damage must be dealt with before files can be salvaged from the failed media.

Most physical damage cannot be repaired by end users. For example, opening a hard disk in a normal environment can allow airborne dust to settle on the platter and become caught between the platter and the read/write head, causing new head crashes that further damage the platter and thus compromise the recovery process. Furthermore, end users generally do not have the hardware or technical expertise required to make these repairs. Consequently, costly data recovery companies are often employed to salvage important data.

Physical Damage Recovery Techniques:
Recovering data from physically damaged hardware can involve multiple techniques. Some damage can be repaired by replacing parts in the hard disk. This alone may make the disk usable, but there may still be logical damage. A specialized disk-imaging procedure is used to recover every readable bit from the surface. Once this image is acquired and saved on a reliable medium, the image can be safely analysed for logical damage and will possibly allow for much of the original file system to be reconstructed.

Hardware repair
Media that has suffered a catastrophic electronic failure will require data recovery in order to salvage its contents.

Examples of physical recovery procedures are: removing a damaged PCB (printed circuit board) and replacing it with a matching PCB from a healthy drive, performing a live PCB swap (in which the System Area of the HDD is damaged on the target drive which is then instead read from the donor drive, the PCB then disconnected while still under power and transferred to the target drive), read/write head assembly with matching parts from a healthy drive, removing the hard disk platters from the original damaged drive and installing them into a healthy drive, and often a combination of all of these procedures. Some data recovery companies have procedures that are highly technical in nature and are not recommended for an untrained individual. Many of these procedures will void the manufacturer’s warranty.

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